Cancer Care and Prevention

Cancer Care and Prevention

An immediate priority of the Botswana-Rutgers Partnership for Health is to address the country’s urgent cancer care and prevention needs. The cancer mortality rate in Botswana is close to 75 percent, and many patients present with advanced disease. There are minimal prevention and support services, long delays in cancer detection and diagnosis, deficiencies in the availability of cancer medications, unreliable data registries, and severe shortages in the specialty-trained workforce.

By establishing a national, comprehensive cancer care and prevention program, Botswana can save lives, prevent disease, and create a model for implementation in other African nations and developing countries around the world.

As part of our work to build this program together with Botswana, the following projects are underway:

National Cancer Needs Assessment
Breast Cancer Research
Global Oncology Fellowships

 

National Cancer Needs Assessment

In Botswana, there are four referral hospitals that either provide some level of oncologic care, or are where oncologic care is being planned by the country’s Ministry of Health and Wellness. These are Princess Marina Hospital in Botswana’s capital city of Gaborone, Letsholathebe Memorial Hospital in Maun, Nyangabgwe Referral Hospital in Francistown, and Sekgoma Memorial Hospital in Serowe.

The national cancer needs assessment is beginning with an evaluation of the current health system and services available for cancer across these four hospital sites. This includes not only an assessment of health facilities but also gathering perspectives from health care providers, cancer patients and survivors, caregivers, members of the public, and local nongovernmental organizations that support cancer care and prevention programs.

With support from the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, the national cancer needs assessment also will go beyond these four hospital sites to include representative small and mid-sized clinical sites throughout the country.

The national cancer needs assessment will provide key insights into awareness about cancer and its prevention, disparities in access to cancer-related services, and the difficulties of continuity of care based on different locations and types of facilities in Botswana.

 

Breast Cancer Research

Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women in Botswana. A lack of screening and early detection, long delays in diagnosis, and limited treatment options mean that many women present with breast cancer at advanced stages, at which point recovery is far less likely.

There is a dire need to improve timely access to breast cancer care in Botswana. Our aim is to identify and address crucial deficiencies in information and support.

Our current project, “Improving Timely Access to Care for Women with Advanced Stage Breast Cancer in Botswana,” is funded by UICC’s (Union for International Cancer Control) SPARC MBC Challenge. Through qualitative research methods, such as focus group discussions with breast cancer patients and caregivers, we are uncovering gaps in breast cancer care at the patient level, clinician level, and health system level. We also are working to understand knowledge gaps in breast cancer care and prevention among primary care practitioners. Ultimately, to improve the care received by breast cancer patients with advanced disease, we will train and implement a system of patient navigators to assist and support patients through their treatment journey.

Learn more about this study.

 

Global Oncology Fellowships

Through partnerships with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the University of Botswana, and Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana, we co-developed a global oncology fellowship to help improve cancer care and prevention in the region.

Each year, two fellows participate in a yearlong program that includes a one-month research elective in Botswana. They gain exposure to the realities of cancer care in the country; provide mentorship to junior medical officers, residents, and hospital staff; and conduct research. Projects have included gathering and analyzing data on chemotherapy utilization and stockouts, developing cancer care guidelines, and creating oncology staff protocols.